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Connect with Chief Mark Emery if you have any questions before the scheduled session.

Many thanks to Chief Emery for his dedication in creating a better fire service through our Fire Coaching Fridays.

Schedule of
"Fire Coaching Friday's Events & Webinars 
 

Subject topics may change without notice.

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Our video sessions will be posted on Friday mornings at 8:00 am!

 

PREVIOUS WEBINARS AND VIDEOS

Friday, March 19
Video - The Quest for Success
Mark Emery, Fire Chief (Ret.)

How do you define success? Leadership development begins with the definition of ‘success.’ Genuine, meaningful success is more important than mere acquisition or achievement. A promotion is achievement – not success; the accumulation of money, a bigger house, or the latest digital gizmo is acquisition – not success. Meaningful success is a Zen-like quality that is simple and powerful. Once you choose Honorable Success, you will possess a gift that is beyond the value of achievement or the acquisition of ‘stuff.’ While sculpting your leadership you must chisel-away years of negative baggage that has been reinforced by competition, comparison, and rationalization. It requires time and energy but once genuine success is revealed, you will be a new person – ready to become a leadership masterpiece!
 

Embracing the Honorable Success concept will improve your life, your family, and your fire department.

 

Mark Emery

After 40-years of service, Mark Emery recently retired as the Fire Chief at East Valley Fire Department in Yakima County, WA. Mark self-published the ITAC Strategic Development manual, and has published numerous articles for Firehouse magazine, FireRescue magazine, and for the FDSOA Health and Safety Newsletter. Mark is co-developer of the Integrated Tacti­cal Accountability System (ITAC), and creator of the popular ITAC Command Competency Clinic. Chief Emery was selected as the 2015 George D. Post Instructor of the Year at FDIC, and serves as the Region 10 Director of the National Fire Academy Alumni Association.

Friday, March 26
Video:  Dangerous Properties of Hazardous Materials
Instructor:  Randy Perlis, HazChem

This class will present and discuss the various physical and chemical properties that determine the hazard classification and dangers associated with hazardous materials. Using actual case scenarios, the hazards associated with these chemicals will be presented. Participants will learn what makes a substance a hazardous chemical and what dangers are associated with the chemical hazards.


Learning Objectives:

Participants will learn about what conditions make hazardous materials become dangerous.

Participants will learn how to predict how certain hazardous materials can become dangerous.

Participants will learn regulations pertaining to the handling and disposal of hazardous materials.

Randy Perlis
Randy Perlis, speaker for the course, has a master’s degree in analytical chemistry with 30+ years in hazardous materials and environmental chemistry and has been a hazardous materials instructor since 1986. He was an EPA START contractor and on the Hazardous Materials Regional Response Team for 25+ years. He has developed several techniques to rapidly assess the chemical, biological, and radiological hazards at response sites utilizing several reliable screening techniques. He has assisted many companies and schools in options for chemical management including disposal options.


Friday, March 26
"SURPRISE" video!

It’s not Rocket Science - Tactical Considerations and Actions; Understanding the “Why”

Instructor: Paul Strong

You’re riding in the hot seat and need to make effective decisions when you arrive at the fire. More importantly, you better understand why you are doing what you are doing. We’re going to discuss fire behavior / dynamics, tactical considerations, spot-on size up, and your initial actions in those first 10 minutes. This is an interactive class that requires your participation in discussion and practice with developing your initial radio reports, follow up reports, initial action plan, and putting your plan to work. We will use videos and tactical simulations in this class to support real world decision-making.

 

THE TARGET AUDIENCE AND THE PRESENTATIONS RELEVANCE TO THE AUDIENCE

The target audience for this class is the company officers and acting officers who are showing up to the fire and expected to make critical decisions. The decisions and actions taken in the first 10 minutes will determine how the rest of the incident plays out. Attendees will walk away with increased knowledge, understanding, and confidence in their decisions made on the fire ground.



Friday, April 2                                            Click Here to View Presentation
**Available On-Demand** LIVE INTERVIEW

Courageous Conversations on Diversity and Inclusion
9:00 am

Jeff Meston, Fire Chief
This is a beginning of a series of conversations we will be hosting on diversity and inclusion in the fire service.  Join us as Chief Meston and a distinguished group of fire personnel from California discuss some of the tough topics having to do with diversity.  This is why we're calling it "Courageous Conversations."
 

Jeff Meston
Jeff Meston is the current Executive Director of the California State Firefighters Association and a past President of the California Fire Chiefs Association.  He is a 43 year plus veteran of the fire service working for the City of Madera Fire Department and serving as Fire Chief in both the Novato Fire District and the City of South Lake Tahoe Fire Department.  He holds a master’s degree in Public Administration, is a California Certified Fire Chief & National Fire Academy Executive Fire Officer.  He has served as President of the Marin County Fire Chiefs Associations and Lake Tahoe Regional Fire Chiefs Associations.  Meston has served as a course developer and instructor at the National Fire Academy and the California Fire Service Training and Education System.  Meston recently retired and has served as the Acting City Manager for South Lake Tahoe as well as its fire chief.  Meston also served on the Board of Directors for FIRESCOPE, representing City’s North. He currently is assigned as a Deputy Chief working for CalOES Fire/Rescue as a liaison between the Emergency Medical Service Authority and CalOES Fire/Rescue during the COVID19 pandemic and principal author of the State of California’s Blue Ribbon Fire Commission Report to the Governor, 2021 all-risk update.

Friday, April 2

"SURPRISE" video!

Video - Chemical Suicides   

Instructor:  Jeffrey Zientek
Chemical suicides present challenges for first responders, especially if they have never encountered them or are not familiar with the process.  Many times, the victim warns emergency responders, however, many times they do not!  This session introduces the chemical-assisted suicides process, describes real-life examples, and provides tips on how first responders can rapidly recognize a potential chemical suicide event. Includes guidance for responding to these events in ways that protect responders and members of the public.

Jeffrey Zientek

Jeff Zientek is a retired Fire Captain who served 33 years with the Phoenix Fire Department.  Jeff title was On-Duty Safety Officer, and he responded to all hazardous materials incidents, technical rescue incidents, and all greater alarm fires, not only in Phoenix, but the surrounding 27 other fire departments in the Phoenix automatic aid system, covering approximately 2000 square miles.   Jeff is a certified Technical Rescue Technician, Hazardous Materials Technician, and Helicopter Rescue Crew Chief and when not responding and working special operations incidents his responsibilities included; evaluation, purchasing, and inventory of all the hazardous materials equipment used by the 6 Phoenix Hazardous Material Teams, assisting with continued education classes for the Hazmat and Technical Rescue technicians in Phoenix and surrounding agencies, managing the helicopter rescue program by continued training of rescue Crew Chiefs, ground crews, and coordination with the Phoenix Police Department rescue pilots.                                        
 

Jeff is also the author of the book “Hazmat Response; A Field Operations Guide” which gives 1st responders and Hazmat Technicians critical information for working a hazardous materials incident.  The book is currently in its 2nd Edition.  In his spare time, he likes to ride his mountain or road bike, hike the many trails and canyons in AZ, and ride his motorcycle across the country. 

Friday, April 9
**Available On-Demand** LIVE INTERVIEW        
Click Here to View Presentation
Clean Concept Fire Stations
10:00 am
Deputy Chief Tom Cole, Goodyear Fire Department, AZ

Goodyear is like many departments across the country.  They are a 100 member organization that has suffered an inordinate number of industrial cancer cases amongst their employees.  Chief Cole will discuss the three years of research, planning, and teamwork that went into building the newest fire stations. The overriding planning assumption was to work within our budget to create the safest and cleanest fire station we could. 

Join us to hear Chief Cole talk about the three key principles that guided the design for the newest facilities, as well as many other building design details. The new fire stations have been well received in the community, by our firefighters, and by our peers in the automatic aid consortium.

Tom Cole
Tom Cole is the Deputy Chief of Fire Operations for the Goodyear Fire Department. He is a native Arizonan whose career started in 1994 with the Glendale (AZ) Fire Department and he has been with Goodyear since 2013. Tom has been a paramedic since 1997 and served as firefighter, fire captain, battalion chief, and deputy chief. Tom has a Bachelor’s degree in Fire Science from Columbia Southern University, and the designation of Certified Public Manager from Arizona State University.


 

Friday, April 16
Video - Habits of Highly Effective Incident Commanders
Fire Chief Kevin Ward

Safe, efficient and effective firegrounds are led by high performing incident commanders. Correlations exist between dysfunctional incident commanders and line of duty deaths. In a world of low frequency high risk events such as structure fires, developing successful habits will aid the IC in providing the leadership and structure necessary to achieve high performance. This course will cover many aspects and successful habits with practical applications and incident specific tactics.

Outline:

  • Functional vs Dysfunctional Command Operations

  • LODDs and Poor Command Correlation

  • What does a high performing incident commander look like?

  • What kind of “habits” do they have?

  • Strategic Principles- Are we using the right playbook?

  • Efficient and Effective Practical Application

  • Support Officer/FIT/Aide use

  • Tactical Worksheets & “T” boxes 

  • “ERUPTTT” acronym for Maydays

  • Effective fireground communications

 

 

Kevin Ward

Kevin Ward has been the fire chief for the Layton City (UT) Fire Department since 2004. Prior to his appointment, Chief Ward served 24 years with the Chandler (AZ) Fire Department, retiring as a battalion chief. He has served as an officer for over 36 years of his career. While in Chandler, Ward served as a training officer, public information officer, hazardous materials team coordinator, wildland fire program coordinator, administrative battalion chief, and emergency medical services (EMS) division chief. Prior to his promotion to battalion chief, Ward spent 18 years as a captain/paramedic on both engine and ladder companies. Chief Ward has achieved qualifications through the National Wildfire Coordinating Group as an engine boss, strike team and task force leader, structure protection specialist, and Type 3 incident commander. He has been an instructor for the Utah Fire & Rescue Academy Command Training Center since its inception. Chief Ward currently serves as Vice President of the Utah Fire Chiefs Association and chairs the Utah Fire Officer Designation Program.

 

Friday, April 16
Video - Emerging Terrorist Threats for First Responders

Instructor:  Chris Angermuller

This course will provide an overview of recent terrorist events that have occurred across the world and the threat to first responders. A comprehensive review of methodology and modern methods that terrorist utilize to cause disruption and harm will be presented. This course will also evaluate and present ways that hazmat teams and law enforcement can work together to increase responder safety and mitigate a potential terrorist incident in a more efficient manner.

Chris Angermuller

Chris Angermuller CFO, CTO and MIFireE is a 25 year veteran of the fire service and is currently the Deputy Fire Chief with the Grand Junction (CO) Fire Department. Prior to working at Grand Junction Fire Department, he served as the Assistant Fire Chief of the Kingman (AZ) Fire Department where he oversaw the departments daily operations and Special Operations Teams. During his time in Kingman he served as the departments Terrorism Liaison Officer with the Arizona Counter Terrorism Information Center and currently serves as a Committee Member for the International Association of Fire Chiefs Hazardous Materials Committee. He also currently sits on the International Fire Service Training Association validation committee for Hazardous Materials Awareness, Operations and Technician text books. He is a graduate of the University of Kansas with a Master's Degree in Public Administration. He has also served as a lead instructor for the Kansas State Fire Marshal’s Office where he was tasked with training and evaluating the states hazardous materials response teams.

Friday, April 23
Video - HazMat Role in Confined Spaces
Instructor:  Jeffrey Zientek, HIRT

Confined spaces are becoming more of a hazardous materials incident than a technical rescue incident.  This case study discusses two incidents that happened in the Phoenix area that resulted in the deaths of 5 people total.  Each incident contained different products and different tactics were employed for each.  What is the responsibility of the Hazmat Team on these incidents?  How does product identification effect the rescue/recovery?  What is the PPE choice?  These plus other factors will be explored in this discussion.

 

Jeffrey Zientek

Jeff Zientek is a retired Fire Captain who served 33 years with the Phoenix Fire Department.  Jeff title was On-Duty Safety Officer, and he responded to all hazardous materials incidents, technical rescue incidents, and all greater alarm fires, not only in Phoenix, but the surrounding 27 other fire departments in the Phoenix automatic aid system, covering approximately 2000 square miles.   Jeff is a certified Technical Rescue Technician, Hazardous Materials Technician, and Helicopter Rescue Crew Chief and when not responding and working special operations incidents his responsibilities included; evaluation, purchasing, and inventory of all the hazardous materials equipment used by the 6 Phoenix Hazardous Material Teams, assisting with continued education classes for the Hazmat and Technical Rescue technicians in Phoenix and surrounding agencies, managing the helicopter rescue program by continued training of rescue Crew Chiefs, ground crews, and coordination with the Phoenix Police Department rescue pilots.                                        

Jeff was a member of the FEMA team, Arizona Task Force 1 (AZTF-1) beginning in 1995, and was responsible for maintaining the hazardous materials cache and equipment, along with training and continuing education of current hazmat members.  In addition, Jeff was an appointed member of the Hazardous Materials Workgroup for FEMA, and along with other members from around the country, worked to keep consistency for the teams in relation to, training, procedures, & equipment.  In his time with FEMA he has been on deployments to Atlanta for the 1996 Olympics, 9/11 terrorist attack in New York City, and the devastating hurricanes of 2005 in southern U.S. (Katrina/Rita). 
 

Jeff is also the author of the book “Hazmat Response; A Field Operations Guide” which gives 1st responders and Hazmat Technicians critical information for working a hazardous materials incident.  The book is currently in its 2nd Edition.  In his spare time, he likes to ride his mountain or road bike, hike the many trails and canyons in AZ, and ride his motorcycle across the country. 

 


Friday, April 23
Video -  Rescue Me – Managing Employee Fires

Instructor: Jesse Quinalty

Most Fire Officers and Chiefs will fight more fires in the station then they will out in the streets. This program will utilize basic fireground terminology to break down and make sense of employee coaching, counseling and disciplinary procedures. It will apply such firefighter knowledge as conducting a size up, which will include looking at the building construction (How the employee is built as well as the condition of the building), the extent and location of the fire (the problem) and doing a risk assessment.

 

Once these observations are considered then a strategy can be determined and tactics can be put in place. We will then utilize the acronym RECEO to determine what tactics to use when dealing with a problem employee. We will also focus on using Fire Prevention, Education, Pre-Planning and Fire Behavior Recognition Training (Reading Smoke) to prevent fires (problems) and keep them small. We will also compare hostile fire events such as rapid fire progression, flashover, backdraft and smoke explosions to the more difficult personnel issues.

Friday, April 30
VIDEO - Food Truck Safety Requirements
Instructor:  Bob Sullivan, NFPA

This presentation will discuss fire safety practices and requirements for food trucks that are found in NFPA 1 (Fire Code), and in Appendix B (Mobile and Temporary Cooking Operations) of NFPA 96 (Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations). As food trucks are becoming increasingly popular, there have been more food truck incidents involving both fires and explosions. The very nature of the food truck industry also presents the Fire Service with significant challenges in enforcing fire safety regulations, extending to cooperative efforts that are needed with other entities such as health department representatives and local government officials. This session will include discussion of all of these issues, as well as review some case studies involving food truck fires.
 

Bob Sullivan
Bob Sullivan is the Southwest Regional Director for the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  Mr. Sullivan has over 31 years of experience serving on fire departments in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Colorado, including several years at the rank of Lieutenant. Prior to coming to NFPA, he served on the Thornton Fire Department in Colorado as the Senior Fire Protection Engineer and Deputy Fire Marshal, focusing on new development construction and fire code enforcement. Previously, Mr. Sullivan worked for National Foam Inc./Kidde Firefighting USA and Industrial Risk Insurers. He has a Master's Degree in Fire Protection Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist.

Friday, May 7
Video - Tactical Decontamination for Hazardous Materials & WMD Incidents

Instructor:  David Ladd, ECP Hazmat

This course was developed to provide all first responders the tools and knowledge to effectively determine exposure, develop and establish a decontamination strategy, and decontaminate those victims of incidents that involve Hazardous Materials/WMD’s.
 

Tactical decontamination is the aggressive targeted application of decontamination techniques that specifically enhance first responder safety and patient care during hazardous materials and multi-threat incidents.

 

The following categories of Hazardous Materials/WMD’s and the decontamination strategy for each will be presented:

•       Differentiate between exposure and contamination.

•       Identify the various routes of exposure.

•       Discuss the chemical properties that play a role in decontamination.

•       Identify methods of decontamination in a given incident:

•       Hazardous materials/WMD’s and select chemicals

•       Intentional and accidental exposure/contamination

•       Multi-threat incidents involving law enforcement

•       Identify the 4 levels of PPE for decontamination

•       Health care/1st Responder considerations for handling a contaminated patient

This course will allow the participant to determine the appropriate course of action utilizing hazard response information. The pros and cons of various decontamination tactics will also be discussed to ultimately assist the responder with determining the best decontamination strategy to initiate.  

David Ladd
David Ladd has been involved in Fire Service/Hazardous Materials instruction for the past 17 years.  He has worked as an author, lead instructor, course developer, and subject matter expert in chemistry & toxicology for the National Fire Academy, ATEC, College of Southern Nevada, and Hazmat IQ© by federal resources.  He has co authored curriculum for the National Fire Academies R247 ALS Response to Hazardous Materials Incident, and was the lead developer and instructor of Hazmat IQ’s Tox-Medic © program.

David has also authored response protocols to various CBRNE, Hazardous Materials/WMD incidents and tox-medic programs.  He has both instructed and lectured to LE and Fire/EMS departments and has lectured at various conferences across the United States.

Friday, May 14

Video - Organic Chemistry for Hazardous Materials Responders

Instructor:  Randy Perlis
This class will present and discuss the various physical and chemical properties that are associated with common industrial organic chemicals. Using actual case scenarios, the hazards associated with organic chemicals will be presented and how to identify the characteristic hazards associated with these chemicals.

Randy Perlis
Randy Perlis, speaker for the course, has a master’s degree in analytical chemistry with 30+ years in hazardous materials and environmental chemistry and has been a hazardous materials instructor since 1986. He was an EPA START contractor and on the Hazardous Materials Regional Response Team for 25+ years. He has developed several techniques to rapidly assess the chemical, biological, and radiological hazards at response sites utilizing several reliable screening techniques. He has assisted many companies and schools in options for chemical management including disposal options.
 

Friday, May 21                    CLICK HERE TO VIEW PRESENTATION
Courageous Conversations Series
Firefighter Line-of-Duty Death:  Why Have the Same Factors Been Occurring for Decades?

Guest Expert Panelists
Fire Chief Mark Emery, (Ret.), WA, Host & Moderator
Dr. Richard Gasaway, Situational Awareness Matters, Consultant
Deputy Chief Stewart Rose, (Ret.) Training and Safety, Seattle Fire Department

Chief John Tippett, Jr., Director of Fire Programs with the National Fallen Firefighter Foundation (NFFF)

Chief Ian Bennett, Coordinator, NFFF Local Assistance State Team Program

 

WEBINAR OVERVIEW

This difficult—and important—conversation will focus on why a small cluster of strategic and tactical factors have continued to kill Firefighters for decades.

 

Firefighter fatalities have been investigated since 1984. Prior to NIOSH (the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, investigations were conducted and published by the USFA (United States Fire Administration) Prior to 1984, no organization was tasked with investigating Firefighter fatality incidents.

 

Each NIOSH fatality investigation report provide recommendations for preventing the repeat of these causational factors. These key strategic and tactical factors have been repeating again and again for decades. These key factors are the responsibility of Fire Officers and incident managers.

 

One key element not mentioned by NIOSH is the influence of culture as a contributing factor.

 

We will not be discussing
Specific NIOSH fatality reports 

Apparatus-related or physiologic fatalities

Key repeating strategic factors are:

  • No size-up

  • No risk-assessment

  • Lack of accountability

  • Random and undisciplined radio communication

  • Lack of rapid intervention

  • Random acts of tactical violence (losing control of ventilation)

  • No Incident Commander at a Command Post

  • No Safety Officer

  • No periodic situation reevaluation (tied to incident clock)

 

HONOR THE DECEASED

  • Honor by being honest

  • Honor by learning

  • Honor by improving

  • Honor by not repeating

 

Given the choice, it is likely that each deceased Firefighter would prefer those four things occur rather than a funeral with bagpipes.

Friday, May 28
Video:  Flammable Refrigerants
Instructor:  Bob Sullivan, NFPA

This presentation will discuss the new NFPA Flammable Refrigerants Fire Fighter Training Material Development Workshop that was held in September, 2018. The multi-billion dollar refrigeration industry is starting to move toward new types of refrigerants that are more environmentally friendly fluids, but they are also much more flammable than current types of refrigerants. This shift has already occurred in other countries, and will soon occur in the United States as well. As new refrigerants with higher flammability are phased in, there will be new hazards which the Fire Service and emergency responders will need to be aware of to make adjustments in firefighting tactics. This session will discuss this new information and the efforts that are underway to provide updated training for the Fire Service, including relevant codes and standards, hazard identification, emergency response tactics, and post-incident considerations. 

Bob Sullivan
Bob Sullivan is the Southwest Regional Director for the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  Mr. Sullivan has over 31 years of experience serving on fire departments in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Colorado, including several years at the rank of Lieutenant. Prior to coming to NFPA, he served on the Thornton Fire Department in Colorado as the Senior Fire Protection Engineer and Deputy Fire Marshal, focusing on new development construction and fire code enforcement. 

 

Previously, Mr. Sullivan worked for National Foam Inc./Kidde Firefighting USA and Industrial Risk Insurers. He has a Master's Degree in Fire Protection Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist.

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